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John Rosemond’s ~ New Parent Power!

John Rosemond is the dean of traditional, non-psychological parenting. Now, the author of many best-selling books on raising children has combined his two most successful volumes into a single revised and updated edition for new parents — and those who need new ideas. John Rosemond’s “New Parent Power!”  presents the renowned family psychologist’s complete philosophy and methodology from the original “Parent Power!” supported by the details of his Six-Point Plan For Raising Happy, Healthy Children.

The following review is from Catherine S. Vodrey, East Liverpool, Ohio United States.

I’m intrigued by other reviews that gripe about the lack of new material in John Rosemond’s latest update on “Parent Power!” Remember, folks, the key word here is “update.” It makes no claims to be an entirely new book. The other thing to bear in mind is that good, sound, commonsensical advice on parenting is essentially the same today, as it was a hundred–or a thousand–years ago. It all boils down to one simple concept: you are in charge; the child is not.

Some people find Rosemond harsh. Those tend to be parents who are willing to fill their time by wheedling, cajoling and bargaining with their children. Others find Rosemond to make perfect sense. Those tend to be parents who understand (and apply!) the fundamental concept that the parents have more experience and more expertise than the children do.  It is a parental responsibility to take charge and tell the children what the rules are, how the family works and what the consequences are for disobedience.

Rosemond knows whereof  he speaks.  Not only is he a parent himself (two grown children–he’s now a grandfather), but he has a doctorate in his chosen field.  The thing he writes in “Parent Power!” that struck me like a bolt of lightning was that parents who let their kids take the lead and rule the roost are doing the children a disservice.  Kids need and crave structure and order. They like knowing what the boundaries are (even if at first it appears that they don’t!). When parents set boundaries and then don’t keep within them–or lay down rules and then capitulate at the first request from the child–it actually disturbs the child, because it comes across as though the PARENT doesn’t really know what the rules are. And to the kid, that translates to the frightening thought, “Well, gosh, if Mom and Dad don’t know what the rules are, who DOES know?”

There’s so much good stuff here. I urge every parent–frustrated or not–to be open-minded and read this terrific book. It’s a treasure trove of useful, usable, sound information.

Click this link to buy your copy.

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